Why the IDF doesn’t have a digital platform to deal with complaints

Israel’s military forces, in the midst of an ongoing war with Hamas, have long faced complaints from members of the public over the way they deal with such complaints.

A recent study found that over the past two years, at least 16,000 complaints had been lodged with the IDF’s cybercrime unit, which is tasked with cracking down on such complaints and taking appropriate measures against those who commit them.

While the number of complaints has been rising in recent months, it’s not clear how many of them were actually filed with the cybercrime office, and how many were actually investigated.

While there is a military code of conduct that includes a number of prohibitions against harassment of individuals or groups, there are no specific measures in place to tackle complaints about the conduct of IDF soldiers.

A military spokesperson declined to comment on the issue, but the IDF did issue a statement on Thursday saying that the IDF has a robust system in place for handling complaints regarding the conduct and conduct of soldiers and that such complaints are investigated by military investigators and by the Cyber Security Command.

In response to questions from Haaretz, a military spokesperson said that IDF cybercrime investigators are trained to investigate and prosecute violations of military rules, while also providing feedback to the military command.

The spokesperson said the IDF will continue to improve its processes and procedures, and that it has a strong policy against harassment.

In addition to military regulations, the IDF also has a cybercrime policy that states that complaints about conduct should be investigated and investigated thoroughly.

But the IDF itself does not have a formal system in which to deal if a member of the armed forces is found to have violated military rules.

The military is known to employ individuals who are experts in the field of cybercrime and who are also experts in handling complaints, as well as those who specialize in computer-related issues, the spokesperson said.

It is up to the Military Advocate General to decide whether to initiate investigations.

The IDF spokesperson said it is important to remember that the military is a law enforcement agency, which means that the commander must take action against any individual who violates the rules of engagement or is a threat to the lives of others.

In the meantime, the military has been cracking down aggressively on online threats, with more than 2,000 soldiers arrested in 2016.

The army has also begun sending military police to certain internet cafes and internet service providers.

The number of military police officers has risen by about 2,500, to about 3,300, in recent years, with an additional 1,200 officers in the army’s cyber-crime unit.

According to the Defense Ministry, the average soldier in the military receives about 100 warnings a year about cyberattacks and cybercrime.

The army has faced some criticism for its treatment of cyberattacks, with a 2014 report detailing widespread cyberattacks in the defense ministry.

The report found that the army had lost approximately 2,600 cyberwarfare operations and had lost some 4,600 soldiers.

The report also cited complaints about poor coordination of cyber attacks and failures to protect critical infrastructure, as reported by the Israeli news site Ynet.

In an effort to address cybercrime complaints, the army has been launching a number, which are being monitored by the army cybercrime team.

The cybercrime squad has been tasked with investigating alleged cybercrime offenses, as has the Cyber Investigative Force, which deals with the military’s cyber crime operations.

Last year, the Cyber Operations Command, the unit tasked with fighting cyberattacks against the IDF, also took over the cyberwar crimes unit.